sallyhanan’s blog

A writer’s blog

Copyright your blog posts and speed things up January 17, 2010

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Maw Books’ second Bloggiesta challenge has passed, but I approve wholeheartedly of the slow and steady method of starting/finishing the race (mostly because I forgot about it). I encourage you all to complete everything on the challenge list because it just makes sense.

Danielle from There’s a Book challenges us to create a blogging cheat sheet.
This list could include:
URLs you use repeatedly,
blog post templates,
links to royalty-free photos,
author interview templates,
book review templates.
                                                                                                                   
A great idea, posted by some of Pam’s readers, was to put the completed cheat sheet into Google documents so it could be accessed it from anywhere. Danielle has posted her mock sheet here.

Pam from Bookalicio.us helps everyone to keep ahead of copyright issues by giving advice in how to:
update the homepage,
pay the fee for copyright registration,
check to see if people are posting your work as their own,
add an automatic copyright to your feeds.

Pam also suggests a WordPress plugin to help your SEO.

I used a different widget that works with WordPress.com. I’ve added it to my cheat template, and you can check it out at the bottom of this post.

Comment here when you have completed both mini-challenges so I can give you a high five. 🙂

Sally

P.S. Don’t forget to keep posting your five comments a day on other blogs.

 

 

Every piece of writing needs to be clear and precise. With microscope in hand, Inksnatcher’s writing and editing service will hone any work until it glitters in the light of a 1,000 watt bulb.

sallylogo3 INKSNATCHER.COM                                                                                                                                      

 

 

 

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Publish your e-book with Smashwords November 16, 2009

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Smashwords is a great idea Mark Coker thought up. Why not set up a site on which writers can upload their e-books for free and then sell them to the public? Mark’s beta site went public on May 6, 2008. Since then, the company has added support services, tagging, coupon generators, publishers’ pages, a marketing guide, writing contests, affiliate marketing, and distribution agreements with Barnes & Noble and Sony.

“Over one billion of the world’s roughly 6.5 billion inhabitants subsist on less than $1 a day. Paper books are simply too expensive for most of the world.” ~ Mark Coker, Smashwords

Here are some of the pros and cons of publishing an e-book with Smashwords:

PROS
—The moment your book is ready and formatted (according to the Smashwords formatting guide), you can upload your Word file and let the world read it.
—Smashwords converts the Word file into many optional reading formats to make your book compatible with most of the book-reading devices available these days. Formats available: HTML, JavaScript, Kindle, Epub, PDF, RTF, LRF, Palm doc, plain text download, plain text Web view,
—You retain all rights to your book.
—You get to decide how much of the book you want readers to preview.
—Smashwords continues to negotiate with various online retail outlets to ensure the best possible distribution potential for your book.
—Smashwords only takes a 15% fee and you get to keep the rest (and you can change the price as often as you want to).
—Writers from all over the world can publish their books with Smashwords.


“By moving books into the digital realm, we can start to change the economics of book publishing, while at the same time making great independent books available to people of all economic backgrounds from around the world.” ~ Mark Coker, Smashwords
                                                                 

CONS
—You tend to post it too quickly, before you are positive there are no formatting mistakes or before you give it the final read through.
—Most writers practically give their books away so it’s still hard to make a decent profit.
—You cannot post other people’s reviews of your book, only the reviewers can. It’s already a blessing to have someone read and review your book, so it feels even greedier to ask them to then go to the site to post the review again.
                                                                 

I began the process of uploading my flash fiction collection, Joy in a Box, a few months back, thinking it would lessen the pain of not having the printed version for a while. It’s great to have a place where readers can preview the first three stories, and, because of Smashwords’ free coupon generator, it has been extremely useful to be able to link reviewers to it.
                                                                                                                                  

 

 

Every piece of writing needs to be clear and precise. With microscope in hand, Inksnatcher’s writing and editing service will hone any work until it glitters in the light of a 1,000 watt bulb.

sallylogo3 INKSNATCHER.COM                                                                                                                                      

 

 

 

 

Spruce up your blog June 21, 2009

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‘Tis a far far better thing that I just did than I have ever done (with my blog). Bloggiesta is now over, and I am highly grateful to Maw Books for hosting it, and to her friends for the many challenges they put forth.

I typed my last words at 2 a.m. on a laptop while in bed. My husband’s hopes of activity were sorely dashed, but I had to let Ruth of the Bookish Ruth blog know that I had completed her challenge so that I could be in with a chance to win her prize. What that is, I have no idea. IE won’t let me read her page anymore. After telling my husband that information, he felt even more special.

Here is what I have done after forty-eight hours of challenges:
Written two back-up posts for rainy/busy days
Invited a guest blogger
Created a template post with my “add this” button and my editing services banner. (Isn’t the banner great? I can’t believe I managed to pull that one off without high-tech hubby’s help!)
Cleaned up tags and my sidebar
Made an inksnatcher favicon
Edited and updated my “about me” page and some older posts
Left a comment on the pages of those who put forth the challenges
Learned that I need to offer the RSS feed via e-mail, I should post serial posts, and I should have a photo in my “about me” section.
Brought all of my social network profiles up to date
Got a second gravatar
Read some tips from the Blogging Tips group on the Book Blogs Ning
Wrote a rainy day opinion post
Read and commented on ten new blogs
Set up Google alerts to give me info. on who talks about me and my services, and when
Gave an elevator pitch about my blog
Got listed on two new blog search engines
Begged for a blogging friend–one possibility in the works
Learned how to anchor text
Read five articles from 27 Must Read Tips & Tutorials for Bloggers
Had my blog graded—got 67/100
Added my URLs to Delicious

I’m whacked. I think I’ve put in about twenty-six hours. Nap time now.:)

 

 

Every piece of writing needs to be clear and precise. With microscope in hand, Inksnatcher’s writing and editing service will hone any work until it glitters in the light of a 1,000 watt bulb.

sallylogo3 INKSNATCHER.COM                                                                                                                                      

 

 

 

 

Establish an Online Presence March 6, 2009

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Online presence is one of those new-fangled things that online-savvy people know about and use. Up to a few month ago, I didn’t even know what it meant. As an editor and writer for other people, though, I need to make sure that I am easily found online, because most business these days is garnered through the internet.

If I have a name that is unusual and googling me will instantly find everything I have ever done, that is fantastic (hopefully!). If, however, I have a name like John Smith, then that will absolutely not happen. Some beginner’s steps I’d like to recommend in order to establish an online presence:

1. Buy the domain name “yourname.com” if it is not already gone. Have it redirect to your business site. Any hosting company will have this option.

2. Buy a second domain name that promotes your line of work. I used the name inksnatcher.com, as all of the names that use write, script, edit, etc. (all the obvious names) were already taken. If you can’t think of a name, get your Thesaurus out and use alternative words that people understand.

3. With that second domain, turn the site into something viable which others can come to and read about the writing services you offer. Be sure to only offer services you are sure you can perform.

4. Set up your e-mail account, with the e-mail being one that is easy to remember. Mine is inkmeister@inksnatcher.com.

5. Tell others about the fact that your website is now up and running—post about it on Facebook, Twitter, in your blog, on other forums you are part of.

6. If getting business is diffcult in the beginning, offer to edit or write for someone for free—that way you will have quotes and a list of work already completed.
Inksnatcher business card
7. Design and print good-quality business cards. Be ready to hand them out to anyone who could benefit from your services. A family member designed mine, and I used Overnight Prints to print them.

7. Join a business leads/referrals group. This helps to network with other business owners who know people who know people who know. . . . Meet Up can be a good place to find a group near you.

8. Consider adding reciprocal affiliate links to your blog and site; they will bring you more traffic. This means that you add someone’s link to your page and they add yours to theirs.

9. Write articles on your genre of writing or editing—doing so will help you to appear more professional and knowledgable about the subject matter, and your name will come up more often in online searches. There are many sites you can post your writing on: iScribe, Helium, PostArticles, to name a few.

Overall, what I want is to be seen, to be known, and to be thought of or mentioned when editing/writing work is available. The aforementioned list will be part of the ladder that takes me there.

 

 

Every piece of writing needs to be clear and precise. With microscope in hand, Inksnatcher’s writing and editing service will hone any work until it glitters in the light of a 1,000 watt bulb.

sallylogo3 INKSNATCHER.COM                                                                                                                                      

 

 

 

 

 
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